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wulong

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Untitled [Oct. 30th, 2005|07:58 am]
wulong

test

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(no subject) [Sep. 30th, 2005|02:17 am]
wulong
Uh
oh

Is this how I'm going to be spending my 7 day National Holiday?

Quick, someone hide my credit card.
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mandelbrot [Aug. 19th, 2005|12:10 am]
wulong
 $r=25; $c=80;
                                              $xr=6;$yr=3;$xc=-0.5;$dw=$z=-4/
                                              100;local$";while($q=$dr=rand()
                                             /7){$w+=$dw;$_=join$/,map{$Y=$_*
                                             $yr/$r;
  join""                                    ,map{$                  x=$_*$
 xr/$c;($                                   x,$y)=                 ($xc+$x
  *cos($                                   w)-$Y*               sin$w,$yc+
                                           $x*sin              ($w)+$Y*cos
  $w);$                                   e=-1;$                    a=$b=0
;($a,$b)   =($u-$v+$x,2*$a*               $b+$y)                    while(
$ u=$a*$   a)+($v=$b*$b)<4.5  &&++$e     <15;if                     (($e>$
  q&&$e<   15)||($e==$q and   rand()     <$dr))  {$q=$e;($d0,$d1)   =($x,$
  y); }                        chr(+(   32,96,+  46,45,43,58,73,37  ,36,64
 ,32)[$                        e/1.5]   );}(-$   c/2)..($c/2)-1;}   (-$r/2
 )..($     r/2)-1;select$",     $",$", 0.015;                       system
$^O=~m     ~[wW]in~x?"cls":     "clear";print                       ;$xc=(
$d0+15     *$xc)/16;$yc=($       d1+15*$yc)/                        16;$_*=
1+$z for                         $xr,$yr;$dw                     *=-1 if rand
()<0.02;                          (++$i%110                      )||($z*=-1)}


Stick that in your perl interpreter and smoke it!

I'm amazed...

(via http://deoxy.org/meme/Perl/Amazing)
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Did my salary just increase 2%? [Jul. 21st, 2005|06:41 pm]
wulong
http://www.cnn.com/2005/BUSINESS/07/21/china.yuan.reut/index.html

w00t
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GRR [Jul. 19th, 2005|11:13 am]
wulong
http://www.google.com/intl/en/press/pressrel/rd_china.html

It's a bit demoralizing to see the guy who started MS Research in China defect to Google to do the same thing for that company.
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Proclamation No. 23, 2005 General Administration of Customs, the People's Republic of China [Jul. 1st, 2005|12:19 am]
wulong
With a view to regulating the ways inward/outward passengers make declarations, improving transparency in the Customs law enforcement, strengthening the Customs control over passengers’ luggage, maintaining national political, economic and cultural security and following international customary practices, a decision has been made to introduce as of July 1st. 2005 a written declaration system in all air ports of entry in China, details of which are proclaimed as follows:

I. All inward/outward passengers, except those who are exempted from Customs inspection and control in accordance with relevant regulations, or those under the age 16 who are traveling with accompanied adults, shall make a factual declaration to the Customs at air ports of entry by completing a Declaration Form (Please find the attached samples).

II. All inward/outward passengers shall complete a Declaration Form as required and submit it to the Customs officers at the Declaration Desk. Statements made by inward and outward passengers on what they carry in ways, at places and at the time other than those required by the Customs shall not be deemed as legitimate declaration.

III. Inward/outward passengers who select “No” in all the items on the Declaration Form may choose to go through “Nothing-to-declare Channel” (“Green Channel”) for Customs procedures. The articles brought into the country by inward passengers for personal use and within the duty-free amount/value allowed by the Customs shall be released by the Customs free of duty. And those articles taken out of the country by outward passengers for personal use shall be released by the Customs.

IV. Inward/outward passengers who select “Yes” in the items on the Declaration Form shall provide in the corresponding space such details as description (type of currency), quantity (amount), model, etc., before choosing to go through “Having-things-to-declare Channel” (“Red Channel”) for Customs procedures. The Customs shall verify and release the declared articles based on the following rules:

1. Inward passengers

(1) Resident passengers may bring free of duty articles acquired from overseas worth in total of RMB 5,000. The Customs shall levy duties on the portion of articles whose value exceeds the duty-free limit.

(2) Non-resident passengers may bring free of duty articles intended to be left in China, which are worth in total of RMB 2,000. Those exceeding the duty-free limit shall be released subject to payment of Customs duties.

(3) Passengers may bring duty free into the country 1,500 ml. of alcoholic drinks (over 12% volume) and 400 sticks of cigarettes,or 100 sticks of cigars, or 500 grams of smoking tobacco. Those exceeding the duty-free limit but still for personal use shall be released subject to payment of Customs duties.

(4) Passengers who carry over RMB 20,000 in cash or foreign currencies in cash whose value exceeds US$ 5,000 if converted into US dollar shall be dealt with by the Customs according to relevant regulations currently in force. In the case that passengers carry foreign currencies exceeding US$ 5,000 in cash if so converted, which are to be taken out of the country at the end of their stay, a Customs Declaration Form shall be completed in duplicate, one of which shall, after being endorsed by the Customs, be returned to such passengers for relevant procedures at the time of their exit.

(5) Passengers who carry animals, plants and their products, microorganism, biological products, human tissue, blood and its products shall be processed by the Customs in accordance with current regulations.

(6) Passengers who carry radio transmitters/receivers or secure communicators shall be processed by the Customs in accordance with current regulations.

(7) Passengers who carry other articles whose importation are restricted or prohibited according to the law of the People’s Republic of China, shall be dealt with by the Customs in light of current regulations.

(8) Passengers who carry goods, samples and articles for advertisement shall be dealt with by the Customs in accordance with current regulations.

(9) Passengers who declare as having unaccompanied luggage shall be processed by the Customs in accordance with current regulations.

2. Outward Passengers

(1) Passengers who carry for personal use such articles as cameras, camcorders, laptops, whose value exceeds RMB5,000 each, and which are to be brought back after their visit overseas shall complete Declaration Forms in duplicate, of which one copy, after being endorsed by the Customs, will be returned to such passengers for relevant customs procedures at time of their entry.

(2) Passengers who carry over RMB 20,000 in cash, or foreign currencies in cash worth of over US$ 5,000 if so converted shall be dealt with by the Customs in accordance with current regulations.

(3) Passengers who carry such precious metals as gold and silver etc. shall be processed by the Customs in accordance with current regulations.

(4) Passengers who carry antiques, endangered animals, plants and their products, and biological species resource, shall be dealt with by the Customs in accordance with current regulations.

(5) Passengers who carry radio transmitters/receivers or secure communicators, shall be processed by the Customs in accordance with current regulations.

(6) Passengers who carry other articles, the exportation of which are restricted or prohibited according to the law of the People’s Republic of China, shall be dealt with by the Customs in accordance with current regulations.

(7) Passengers who carry goods, samples and articles for advertisement items shall be dealt with by the Customs in accordance with current regulations.

V. Written declarations may not be required for passengers, who are holders of diplomatic passports or are granted courteous visas by competent authorities of the People’s Republic of China, as well as those who are exempted from Customs inspection in accordance with relevant regulations. However, they shall produce their valid identification documents to the Customs officers for courteous treatment.

VI. Violators of the rules stipulated in this proclamation, who carry restricted, prohibited or dutiable goods or articles without declaring to the Customs shall be punished by the Customs in accordance with the Customs Law of the People’s Republic of China and the Implementation Regulations on the Customs Administrative Penalties of the People’s Republic of China.

May 23rd. 2005 Implemented 7/1

Yay, taxes on goods you already bought and bring back to China. Good thing my travel companions were smart enough to know this before we left China.
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Being in Redmond [Jul. 1st, 2005|12:01 am]
wulong
Pros
1. Bathrooms don't smell like sewer
2. Air
3. People are polite

Cons
1. Streets are empty
2. Everything closes at 9
3. People are polite
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出差 [Jun. 23rd, 2005|01:16 am]
wulong
[Current Music |Morcheeba - Part of the Process]

Crap, my 3 months is up. I have to go back to the US...

There's not no rules 'bout this, but I just got put on another project (to bring the grand total to *drumming* 2), so that means that some "project managing" is in order. So, the big fluffy I dunno about program management at Microsoft (oops I said it again) is that we take care of all the stuff that the devs and testers don't have time to take care of because they're too busy doing what they do best: coding and testing (actually the division is blurry because both disciplines dip into each other's bid'nez). That's my 4-month-on-the-job take of "Program Manager." So to aid devs 'n tests while they're hanging out with our counter parts in Redmond I'll be there watching... always watching...

Wow that was a really terrible, unreadable paragraph. I write many of these during my job, but often they have a point and they are directed to convey a certain point.

This post and these paragraphs however are exceptions.

And I am drunk.

And this is my first (non-hidden) public post of my drunk writing.


Sleeep is gooood. I'll put up some pictures. It's much easier to comment on pictures than to come up with prose.
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china bike + 25km/h = SCARS [Jun. 14th, 2005|12:54 pm]
wulong
[Current Music |compass - ... and the Guppies Eat Their Young]

Ouch.

Chinese bikes have internal speed limits, apparently. I was riding my hand-me-down bike on a fairly deserted stretch of asphalt on my way to work and decided to see how fast I could get it going. So, I stand up (mistake one) and pedal the hell out of the, umm, pedals (mistake two). After a few seconds the chain decided it couldn't take the strain and fell off. I lost my balance causing me to fly body-first into the handle bars which meant my next destination was the GROUND. I was going pretty fast, so I've got a few pretty nasty cuts on my hands and arms. People at work reel back in discomfort before they ask what happened...

I was kind of surprised no one came to help. There were a few people walking around, but they didn't even seem to notice. I guess if I had writhed around on the ground for a few minutes I would have gotten some reaction. I got the hell up from my self-inflicted mess, parked my bike and went to the first place I would go if I were in the US -- to the store to buy bandages which was another mistake on my part. you go to the hospital for everything in China; even for check-ups. I didn't know that so I went to the the other monopoly next door to find bandages. They only had little dinky band-aids, but the surprisingly helpful store clerks were helpful enough to offer their first aid kit to me. It must have been all the blood and pus that compelled them to help.

So they still use iodine in China which fucking hurts, but they also use this kinda interesting powder they called 云南白药 which they would rub directly into the wound. I was a bit skeptical at first, but they seemed well meaning, so I put myself in the Walmart clerk's hands. This shit also hurts, but after it was all done, it looked like I already had a scab and all the bleeding stopped. They didn't even need to put a bandage over it -- I just hope I don't get any huge scars. It looks pretty nasty and unpromsing right now.
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shanghai [May. 10th, 2005|12:56 am]
wulong
To round out my Labor Holidays, I had myself a trip to Shanghai with a fellow Microsoftie. Shanghai definitely feels different than Beijing, but that's probably because we spent most of our time in the "touristy" parts of Shanghai -- 新天地 (Xintiandi), 外滩 (The Bund), 南京路 (Nanjing Shopping Street (for those counting). The main difference being architecture and a general sense of cleanliness in most of the public areas that I visited. Oh, and the lack of dust in your mouth when you forget to breathe through your nose.

I met up with uber-blogger (how do you type the umlaut?) John Pasden of Sinosplice fame. We shot the breeze at a random tiny restaurant where he chided me for my lack of Chinese manners by not finishing up a bowl of rice. Still only 3 months into my long-term China experience; I have a lot to learn.

Indeed, another lesson learned -- do not bump into someone on a dance floor and not back down when they put up a front. I was wrestled to the ground by some dude with a personal space problem right into a puddle of beer. Luckily his friends pulled him off me, otherwise he would have had a face full of fist. Actually, the more likely scenario is me with a black eye and many words of explanation owed to my coworkers the next day. That pretty much ended the night, and so I headed back to get a measly 2 hours of sleep before my flight back to Beijing (and straight back to work right from the airport -- that day sucked).

Anyway, many thanks to John for finding time amid his study-crunch to hang out. He took me and my coworker out to see Cold Fairyland (thanks msittig). Pretty cool show, although John says they kicked more ass in the last show he saw them in.

Umm, no segue -- I already used anyway, just random Shanghai pics:
小笼包子 Trashy Reflection 尼红勾 (Nihongo Smatter?)
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